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  1. #11
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    I paid the price. Thought I would order the metal I needed online, that I did, but maybe not the best idea.

    Well the truth is, I do not know metal worth a ?. So I did read about using cold rolled steel over hot rolled, and it is highly advised against hot rolled steel.

    It is hard stuff. Some how I got a piece of hot rolled over the cold rolled I ordered. I did not know the difference in looks of the two metals, so figured I got what I wanted, plus a custom cut size, NO returns on custom cuts.

    It took me over 3 hours yesterday to cut 3" of length, jig saw and metal blade is not the best method on 3/8" thick SS.

    Will try the cutting wheel today and see that goes. Oh yeah, pay attention to undercut sizes listed, seems they favor to give you the undercut length than what you want, at least on me, so order a 1/4" larger in size or more as it depends on their tolerances on cutting sizes. Live and learn, this is a hard lesson to forget, as it is much harder working with this material.

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    There is a difference in hot rolled steel and cold rolled steel.

    But you are not working with steel are you?

    You are working with stainless. There is little to no mechanical difference between cold 2b finish 304 ss, and hot mill finish 304 ss. It is not the same thing as carbon steel definitions.

    Most any stainless over 3/16 thick will be mill finish.

    Stainless (even though not much different than steel structurally) does machine very differently.

    So cut speed, drill speed, turning/milling, will all be at roughly half the speed. Or in other word....take double the time and power to do.

    So when you are ready to drill a hole.....half the rpm.....double the pressure.....and it will take twice as long.

    And yes thin abrasive cut off wheels work well.

  3. #13
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    That is it, the thin abrasive cut off wheel works wonders, operator just needs a steady hand, LOL

    I did not do a super bad job, just a little extra grind time to get to pattern line.

    I got this far yesterday, just the top curvy line to cut out today.

    20180922_202635.jpg

    I could only fine 50 grit sanding drums locally, they take some time, but they do work on cleaning up the edges.

    20180922_202607.jpg

    I just wanted a support bracket, but the daughter seen it laying around and had to put her touch to it, children....

    20180922_202655.jpg

    pic did not stay rotated, but I guess it looks like the "hang loose" sign

    Well I did not get to read all that Rex, thank you for educating me about the metal.

    So I have some work time ahead of me, fun, but nothing good ever comes easy. Better tools, maybe time to get that nice belt sander. It really would help with this project and I really wanted one for my flute making. Tool shopping time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DeathBySnuSnu View Post
    There is a difference in hot rolled steel and cold rolled steel.

    But you are not working with steel are you?

    You are working with stainless. There is little to no mechanical difference between cold 2b finish 304 ss, and hot mill finish 304 ss. It is not the same thing as carbon steel definitions.

    Most any stainless over 3/16 thick will be mill finish.

    Stainless (even though not much different than steel structurally) does machine very differently.

    So cut speed, drill speed, turning/milling, will all be at roughly half the speed. Or in other word....take double the time and power to do.

    So when you are ready to drill a hole.....half the rpm.....double the pressure.....and it will take twice as long.

    And yes thin abrasive cut off wheels work well.
    Not my cup of tea, just know enough to be dangerous, so any tips and tricks I should be aware of Rex ??

    I used a carbide jig saw blade to cut the short side with, the thin cutoff wheel for the longer side, guess I will give a new 24tooth blade the test for this curvy edge.

    Any drill bit tips, special type that will work better than standard, or does it matter, or should I let a machine shop punch my holes for me ??

    Any help is welcomed, seriously I do not know as much as I should know for this project, now just need to finish it.

  5. #15
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    can't offer much but encouragement at this point....never dealt with stainless at work....just mild steel and air hardening tool steel.

    by accident bought .040 x 4.5 in. cutoff wheels instead of the .060....what a difference....the saws are covered with dust!

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    I zipped through the straight lines, so all rough cutting is done. Between the jig saw and the cut off wheel I am keeping close to the pattern line so far. Get so far into the curve than use the cut off wheel to remove material, and than the jig saw is back at work. Not sure how much I will get done today as so many other things on the "To Do" list.

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    Just mostly what I said above.

    Those silver colored drill bits from the hardware store are ok for wood.....but little else.

    Black oxide bits work ok....slow

    Cobalt holds up... but is brittle and easy to break.

    Real carbide is way way brittle and can not use by hand at all.

    Use cutting oil and/or keep it cool. Cutting tools will burn up melt real easily in ss.

    I use Castrol moly dee for low speed cutting lube.

    Castrol_98-890-7.jpg

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    Like most think a drill bit is a drill bit, but we have wood bit for soft, medium, and hard wood, duh.... guess you would have the same for the different metals out there.

    I had the cutting oil and no way was I going to get any cutting down with out the oil, and as you said slow and steady seemed to get me done faster than running the saw at higher speeds.

    It just takes a lot of time and pressure against the sanding wheel to work the edges to the fine pattern line, really only have one major area that has to be dead on the pattern line, that top curvy line and that will take some time to get done.

    Thank you all so much for all the help and advice, as we are getting closer to getting this done.

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    Default almost done, help need advice

    Okay spent the last few days drilling holes in the 304 SS 3/8" thick plate. I read you and seen on you tube that you should drill pilot holes first. 1/8" inch is what was used the most, than step up, so the 6mm only had to do the next size up, the two 8mm bolts to an extra pass. Basically went in 3/32nd increments.

    Used what local store had, thankful it was the recommended type drill bits.

    20180928_154153.jpg

    20180928_153420.jpg

    Now all needs to mount up correctly.

    20180928_153924.jpg

    Okay I got a little lucky that I got all drilled on the mark, no margin for error in how I went about it.

    Now please note: You want to figure out the most important hole first, get it right, than any others in order of importance. A lot of work just to get the pattern cut out and shaped, all could have gotten screwed up if I drilled wrong.

    Now please help me, look at the bottom 1/8th inch pilot hole drilled at the axle location, got it on the money also, but this is the hole I should have drilled first actually and now I doing it last.

    So 7/32, 5/16, 9/16, and than the 3/4" bit ?? or can one do the 1/8, 5/16/,9/16, than3/4, or 5/16 and than 3/4 ?

    Okay next big question. Axle is 17mm dia. and if I drill a 3/4" hole and use the bronze pushing, well it's internal dia. is 5/8" and so it would need to be reamed out to the 17mm, I think that would be to thin.

    Catalog has a 26mm outer dia. with the 17mm internal dia., and 26mm is near a inch. I guess I will look more later for bushings. Help me if you can please.

  10. #20
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    maybe try for a bushing size that gives approximatly an 1/8 in. wall thickness........there should be metric bushings w/17mm id x 25mm....then drill/ream a hole in your mount like 7/8 then have bushing turned on the o.d. to fit the drilled/reamed hole with a light press fit ......just a suggestion?

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